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CORE FAQs - General Questions

  1. What is CORE?
  2. What does the CORE acronym stand for?
  3. What is a NISO Recommended Practice?
  4. Why is CORE a Recommended Practice and not a NISO Standard?
  5. How does CORE Work?
  6. What are the benefits of using the CORE protocol?
  7. Do I need an ERM system to use CORE?
  8. Who are the various parties that need to work together to make this work?
  9. Which library system or serial vendors have adopted CORE?
  10. What is the relationship of CORE to other standards such as SUSHI and COUNTER?
  11. What is the relationship of CORE to EDI?
  12. What are the available CORE schemas and what are their differences?
  13. I want more details. Where can I look?
     

 

  1. What is CORE?
    CORE (Cost of Resource Exchange) (NISO RP-10-2010) was published as a NISO Recommended Practice in August 2010. CORE is a communication format for exchanging information about the cost of resources. It was developed to facilitate the exchange of cost, fund, vendor, and invoice information between Integrated Library Systems (ILS) and Electronic Resource Management Systems (ERMS). This recommend practice can also be used for exchanging such information between any system that wants cost information and any system that can provide it (such as a subscription agent’s system).
     
  2. What does the CORE acronym stand for?
    CORE stands for Cost of Resource Exchange.
     
  3. What is a NISO Recommended Practice?
    It is a "best practice" or "guideline" for methods, materials, or practices that can give guidance to a user. Unlike a standard, use of any or all elements of a Recommended Practice is discretionary; it may be used as stated or modified by the user to meet specific needs.
     
  4. Why is CORE a Recommended Practice and not a NISO Standard?
    CORE was originally released as a draft standard in April 2009 for a one-year period. It was published as a NISO Recommended Practice in August 2010, however, because of the lack of systems vendor (ILS or ERMS) implementations during the trial period. The lack of testing during the trial period was in large part due to the economic downturn, rather than from lack of interest. The ultimate goal of the current CORE Standing Committee is to help CORE Recommended Practice continue to move toward becoming a NISO Standard.
     
  5. How does CORE Work?
    The CORE protocol is generalized to be useful for a variety of transaction partners by identifying and defining data elements that are generally supported by ILS, ERMS, subscription agents, and materials vendors. It provides an XML schema for the exchange of financial data for use by these systems. It also identifies three different scenarios where the exchange of cost information would be useful.
     
  6. What are the benefits of using the CORE protocol?
    CORE allows one system with cost information to share it with another system. The fields that are to be shared and the circumstances under which they are shared are decided by the exchanging partners. This system-to-system sharing of cost data eliminates the need for redundant input of cost data and will reduce human errors that come with manually keying in data.
     
  7. Do I need an ERM system to use CORE?
    Not necessarily. The two major systems that are envisioned to make use of cost information are the library ILS (specifically, financial information contained in order records) and an ERM which allows for tracking of financial information to perform related calculations such as cost per use. Serial vendors are another source of cost information that may use the CORE protocol to exchange that data with an ERMS. The specific module names of the client and server are less important than their function. The client needs information and asks for it from the server. The server locates the desired information and sends it back.
     
  8. Who are the various parties that need to work together to make this work?
    Vendors that develop systems which contain cost information such as ILS and ERMS vendors, library staff, and entities that sell resources are critical to the process.
     
  9. Which library system or serial vendors have adopted CORE?
    None have adopted CORE to date. The lack of implementation is the direct result of the worldwide economic downturn, not a lack of demand from librarians or interest from vendors. The original CORE Working Group and the current CORE Standing Committee have representatives from many of the major subscription vendors, ILS systems, and ERMS vendors. Education, promotion, support, and outreach related to CORE are the goals of the current Standing Committee.
     
  10. What is the relationship of CORE to other standards, such as SUSHI and COUNTER?
    There is not a direct relationship between CORE and these other standards; the ultimate goal is for them to complement one another. In the process of gathering cost-per-use statistics for an institution’s online holdings, CORE, SUSHI and COUNTER might all come into play. In the ideal scenario, if SUSHI enabled the automatic harvesting of COUNTER compliant usage statistics and CORE was able to exchange cost information from an existing system (e.g., an ILS) to another where the usage was stored (e.g., ERMS), calculating cost-per-use would be greatly facilitated.
     
  11. What is the relationship of CORE to EDI?
    CORE is an example of an Electronic Data Interchange (EDI) standard. Many librarians use the terms EDI and EDIFACT interchangeably. In reality, EDIFACT is a specific EDI standard describing business transactions such as orders, claims, and invoices between libraries and suppliers. CORE differs from such standards in that it is used to convey information between two systems, rather than the business transactions handled by EDIFACT.
     
  12. What are the available CORE schemas and what are their differences?
    There is currently one CORE schema is available on the NISO website, at http://www.niso.org/schemas/core/
     
  13. I want more details. Where can I look?
    The CORE Workroom on the NISO website is updated regularly. COREinfo is an open list available for anyone interested in the work of the CORE Standing Committee. COREinfo serves as a way to communicate regularly about the work of the group, to solicit feedback, as a forum for questions, and more. Subscribe now by sending an e-mail to coreinfo-subscribe@list.niso.org.