Home | News & Events | Events | 2017 Events | 2017 NISO Virtual Conferences | June 14 - Images: Digitization and Preservation

NISO Virtual Conference

Images: Digitization and Preservation of Special Collections in Libraries, Museums, and Archives 

Wednesday, June 14, 2017
11:00 - 5:00 p.m. (Eastern Time)

  • About the Conference
  • Agenda & Event Slides
  • Registration
    Can't make it on the conference day? Register now and gain access to the archive for one year.

System Requirements:

  • NISO has developed a quick tutorial, How to Participate in a NISO Web Event. Please view the recording, which is an overview of the web conferencing system and will help to answer the most commonly asked questions regarding participating in an online Webex event.
  • You will need a computer for the presentation and Q&A.
  • Audio is available through the computer (broadcast) and by telephone. We recommend you have a set-up for telephone audio as back-up even if you plan to use the broadcast audio as the voice over Internet isn't always 100% reliable.
  • Please check your system in advance to make sure it meets the Cisco WebEx requirements. It is your responsibility to ensure that your system is properly set up before each webinar begins. 

About the Virtual Conference

This virtual conference will focus on a variety of practical concerns surrounding digitization efforts and long-term preservation of images in the digital environment. It will spotlight such initiatives as the International Image Interoperability Framework and similar initiatives in the on-going digitization of special collections (such as maps, manuscripts, etc.) for purposes of scholarship. Are we achieving the goals established 20 years ago? What has been established by the community as appropriate guidelines and/or the best practices for these activities? In addition to images, new digital output (three-dimensional renderings, virtual exhibits, etc.) are becoming more commonplace. Is the institutional repository the right place to house such scholarship or is there a new space needed for such special collections?
 

Preliminary Agenda

11:00 a.m. – 11:10 a.m. – Introduction
Todd Carpenter, Executive Director, NISO

11:10 a.m. – 11:45 a.m.  Opening Talk: Establishing the Landscape
Confirmed Speaker: Edward M. Corrado (participating in his personal capacity), Associate University Librarian, Dudley Knox Library, Naval Postgraduate School

Many Libraries, Archives, and Museums have begun or are planning digitization and digital preservation initiatives. This presentation will help establish the landscape by introducing the topics of digitization and digital preservation. Various ways that digitization and longterm digital preservation are complementary to each other and how they differ will be discussed.

Edward M. Corrado* is Associate University Librarian at the Dudley Knox Library, Naval Postgraduate School. He is co-author of the monograph Digital Preservation for Libraries, Archives, and Museums, which is now in its second edition. He holds a Masters of Library Service from Rutgers University and B.A. in Mathematics from Caldwell University. *participating in his personal capacity

11:45 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.  IIIF: A Revolutionary Framework for Digital Images on the Web
Confirmed Speaker:  Tom Cramer, Chief Technology Strategist, Stanford University Libraries

IIIF, the International Image Interoperability Framework, is a revolutionary approach for delivering digital images. It defines a small set of APIs (application programming interfaces) for presenting and manipulating image-based resources--such as books, newspapers, manuscripts, maps, musical scores and visual resources—via standard Web technologies. It dramatically reduces the friction of delivering images, and introduces radical new capabilities for viewing, using and interacting with images on the Web. Launched in 2011, IIIF was born out of and is backed by some of the world’s leading research and cultural heritage institutions, and now comprises hundreds of adopters worldwide, scores of compatible software systems, and hundreds of millions of interoperable images. This presentation will introduce IIIF, and demonstrate some of the ways libraries, archives and museums are leveraging it for delivering their digital resources.

Tom Cramer is the Chief Technology Strategist and Assistant University Librarian for the Stanford University Libraries, where he directs the technical development and delivery of Stanford’s digital library services, including digitization, management, preservation and access of digital resources that support teaching, learning and research. He is the founder of the International Image Interoperability Framework (IIIF), and a leader in numerous open source projects, including the Hydra Project (now Samvera); Blacklight and the Fedora Repository. He serves on the steering committees for the Preservation & Archiving Special Interest Group (PASIG), Open Repositories, and the International Internet Preservation Consortium (IIPC).
 

12:15 p.m. – 12:45 p.m.  A look forward and a look back at digitization in Libraries, Archives, and Museums
Confirmed Speaker: Chad Hutchens, Head, Digital Collections, University of Wyoming

Digitization of 2D content is nothing new at this point in time, but did our best practices developed decades ago do what we intended them to do? What’s next on the horizon for the digitization of non-traditional materials like those found in museums and smaller scientific collections? Do we have preservation standards outlined for 3D modelling and other new imagery techniques such as focal stacking, image tiling, RTI (Reflectance Transformation Imagery), and related techniques such as photogrammetry? How do we preserve an online virtual reality exhibition for the future and should we? More importantly, are the specialists in those disciplines thinking about preservation the same way libraries and archives have and if not, how do we begin to have those conversations?

Chad Hutchens is currently the Head of Digital Collections at the University of Wyoming Libraries where his department is engaged with traditional 2D digitization, preservation of born-digital research & data, as well as 3D digitization of paleontological collections in collaboration with the UW Geological Museum.

12:45 p.m. – 1:45 p.m.     Break for Lunch

1:45 p.m. – 2:45 p.m. Technologies in Use and in The Wings (2 speakers)
Confirmed Speaker: Chris Strasbaugh, Digital Resource Archivist and Curator, The Ohio State University;  Julia CorrinUniversity Archivist, Carnegie Mellon University

Future-Proofing: Building Flexibility into Your Digitization Space
Chris Strasbaugh
, Digital Resource Archivist and Curator, The Ohio State University

The age-old advice for building a digitization center is very focused on scanners. While they do have a place in many centers and workflows, they are burdened by being very inflexible. Digitization is so much more than scanners. I propose building flexibility into your workflow via items such as DSLR cameras, Raspberry Pi computers, copy stands, PVC pipe, creativity, and much more to build centers that can be as unique as the projects that cross your desk. While specific setups (and shopping lists) will be discussed, it is also about the questions that need to be asked to determine what you need. Is it a public or staff-only space? 2d or 3d? What type of materials and how large? How big is your space? What do you already have that can be repurposed? This practical talk will get you started towards building the perfect digitization center for you know while providing flexibility for the future.

As photographer, art historian, and now digital curator, Chris Strasbaugh has always been driven to document and preserve cultural heritage. His work as a Digital Library Archivist and Curator at the Knowlton School of Architecture, Landscape Architecture, and City and Regional Planning at The Ohio State University is a perfect mix of his passions in preservation, photography, emerging technology, open access, and metadata management. He works with an archive of unique work, documenting the history of the various programs in the Knowlton School as well as highlighting new work that showcases the students in the programs.

What Comes After: Description, Access, and Long-Term Care of Digital Collections 
Julia CorrinUniversity Archivist, Carnegie Mellon University

A successful digitization project is not just about creating beautiful images, but also about making certain that those same images are accessible. When planning a digitization project, institutions must be sure to include adequate resources for description and long-term preservation. This presentation will draw upon Carnegie Mellon’s twenty-year experience building digital collections, and the unexpected challenges faced while managing and maintaining collections for long-term preservation. Topics discussed in this presentation will include options for metadata capture and creation, low-cost access tools, and a variety of preservation choices.

Julia Corrin currently serves as the University Archivist at Carnegie Mellon University. In addition to managing the University’s physical history, she helps oversee an online repository that holds over 3 million pages of digitized content. She previously served as the Political Collections and Access Archivist at Arkansas State University and received her MSI from the University of Michigan.

2:45 p.m. - 3:15 p.m.  Development of a Revolutionary Scanning Device
Confirmed Speaker: Scott Eldredge, Digital Initiatives Program Manager, Brigham Young University

Libraries and archives around the world are faced with increasing pressure to digitize their special collections materials for preservation and online access. For most institutions, a major challenge to digital conversion is the amount of time required to scan large collections of often-fragile cultural heritage materials. In an effort to alleviate this problem, the Lee Library at Brigham Young University teamed up with a student Capstone team from the Ira Fulton College of Engineering. The result was a working prototype of a revolutionary scanning device designed to significantly increase throughput on scanning of many types of cultural heritage materials, including unbound manuscripts, photographs and negatives. This new scanning device uses digital backs, web cams, lasers, a giant mousepad, and spinning parts to produce FADGI 4-star compliant images at speeds similar to the conveyor belt scanning system famously in use by the Smithsonian Institution. However, this innovative system has the advantages of a smaller footprint, lower cost, the ability to scan transparent media, and can be operated by one person. Testing indicates that a variety of document types can be safely scanned at speeds eight to ten times faster than currently achieved with traditional flatbed scanners. Patents on the design are pending and the Lee Library is currently seeking industry partners to work on further development and distribution of this technology to libraries and archives everywhere.

Scott Eldredge has been the Digital Initiatives Program Manager at Brigham Young University since 1997. He holds an M.A. in history from Brigham Young University and is a member of the Academy of Certified Archivists. He has served terms as chair of the digitization committees of the Greater Western Library Alliance, the Utah Academic Library Consortium, and the Consortium of Church Libraries and Archives. He also serves on the Board of Directors of the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.

3:15 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.  Break

3:30 p.m. - 4:30 p.m. Three Case Studies

Digital Imaging and Preservation for Special Collections at the University of Oklahoma Libraries
Barbara Laufersweiler, Coordinator, Digitization Lab and Project Manager, Knowledge Services, The University of Oklahoma Libraries

Over a period of three years the University of Oklahoma Libraries brought a new digitization facility for special collections materials to full working capacity while providing substantial digitization support for a major exhibition. The more recent focus is building capacity for metadata work, digital preservation, and online access. Whether it is digital photography, metadata guidebooks, or file packaging, the key to this successful new digitization and preservation capability has been to learn, communicate, and improve quickly and iteratively.

Barbara Laufersweiler is Coordinator of the Digitization Lab and Project Manager for Knowledge Services, University Libraries, University of Oklahoma, with the primary focus of digitizing the diverse special collections of the university to be freely accessible online. She holds an MLIS from the University of Oklahoma.

Integrating Images from the History of Medicine into NLM Digital Collections
Jennifer Diffin
, Head, Library Technology Services Section, ‎National Library of Medicine (NLM) and Doron Shalvi, Systems Architect, CSRA

In this case study, the National Library of Medicine will discuss its efforts to integrate its Images from the History of Medicine database into its main online portal, NLM Digital Collections. The presenters will described the impetus behind the effort, the reasons for integrating the systems, and the technical approach that was taken to accomplish the integration.

Jennifer Diffin is Head of the Library Technology Services Section at the National Library of Medicine where she currently Chairs the Digital Repository Working Group. She also oversees management of the ILS, discovery, OpenURL resolver, and other homegrown systems as well as technical support for the Technical Services Division. She holds an MS in Library Science from Simmons College and has over 15 years’ experience as a systems librarian.

Doron Shalvi is a Systems Architect with CSRA, providing full-time support to NLM, with twenty years of experience in designing systems for data management, preservation, access and analysis. He is the system architect for NLM’s Digital Repository, which digitally preserves and makes available online books, manuscripts, documents, films, videos, images, maps, software, data, and other items. His interests are in data analysis, parallel processing, and system architecture. He holds an M.S. in Electrical Engineering from the University of Maryland.

Exploring Every Inch of Harrisonburg: The Robert J. Sullivan Papers
Confirmed Speakers: Grace L. Barth, MLIS, Head of Digital Collections, Libraries & Educational Technologies and Kate Morris, Head of Special Collections, Libraries & Educational Technologies, James Madison University

Acquired by JMU Special Collections in 2014, the Robert J. Sullivan Papers include photographs and over eleven hundred slides documenting the city of Harrisonburg, Virginia during a critical period of growth during urban renewal initiatives from the mid-to-late 20th century. While digitization of the images from this collection allowed us to share it with researchers and the local community, the process of facilitating access revealed several unexpected challenges. Quick adaptability and establishing valuable partnerships were among the many factors that allowed for the successful completion of this project.

Grace leads the Digital Collections department at James Madison University Libraries & Educational Technologies, and previously directed the Visual Resources Center in JMU’s School of Art, Design & Art History. She has extensive experience with digitization of image collections, particularly 35mm slides, and holds a Master of Library and Information Science from the University of South Carolina.

As Head of Special Collections at James Madison University Libraries & Educational Technologies, Kate provides leadership and works to collect and develop unique collections that document the history of the central Shenandoah Valley of Virginia as well as the history of the university. She works with faculty to integrate Special Collections materials into coursework and to acquire rare materials and unique collections that support the curriculum. Kate received her MSIS from SUNY Albany and her B.A. from James Madison University
.

* * * * * * * * *

4:30 p.m. - 5:00 p.m. Roundtable Discussion 
Moderated by: Todd Carpenter, Executive Director, NISO

Registration

SAVE! Register for multiple events.

If paying by credit card, register online.

If paying by check, please use this PDF form.

Registration closes on Tuesday, June 13, 2017 at 4:00 p.m. Eastern.

2017 Registration Costs

  • NISO LSA & Voting Members; NASIG Members 
    • $190.00 (US and Canada)
    • $230.00 (International)
  • Non-Member
    • $255.00 (US and Canada)
    • $295.00 (International)
  • Student
    • $85.00

Additional Information

  • Cancellations made by Wednesday, June 7, 2017 will receive a refund, less a $35 cancellation. After that date, there are no refunds.
  • Registrants will receive detailed instructions about accessing the virtual conference via e-mail the Friday prior to the event. (Anyone registering between Monday and the close of registration will receive the message shortly after the registration is received, within normal business hours.) Due to the widespread use of spam blockers, filters, out of office messages, etc., it is your responsibility to contact the NISO office if you do not receive login instructions before the start of the webinar.
  • If you have not received your Login Instruction e-mail by 10 a.m. (ET) on the Tuesday before the virtual conference, please contact the NISO office at nisohq@niso.org for immediate assistance.
  • Registration is per site (access for one computer) and includes access to the online recorded archive of the conference. You may have as many people as you like from the registrant's organization view the conference from that one connection. If you need additional connections, you will need to enter a separate registration for each connection needed.
  • If you are registering someone else from your organization, either use that person's e-mail address when registering or contact nisohq@niso.org to provide alternate contact information.
  • Conference presentation slides and Q&A will be posted to this event webpage following the live conference.
  • Registrants will receive an e-mail message containing access information to the archived conference recording within 48 hours after the event. This recording access is only to be used by the registrant's organization.